News

DA: Domestic violence led to 16 deaths in 2011

Santa Clara County district attorney's office reports highest number of deaths in nearly a decade

Sixteen people died as a result of domestic violence in Santa Clara County last year -- the highest number of deaths in nearly a decade, the district attorney's office announced Tuesday, Feb. 14.

Two of those who died were Imad Ed Daou and his 22-year-old son Andrew Daou. On the night of July 26, 2011, Ed Daou shot his son to death while he slept in the family's Los Gatos home and then took his own life with a .38-caliber Smith and Wesson revolver. Ed Daou's wife Carmen and daughter Christina appeared at a Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office news conference Tuesday morning.

Carmen Daou said her husband carried out the act three weeks after she filed for divorce and obtained a restraining order against him that required him to stay away from her and Christina. She said the couple had a history of domestic violence, although no charges were ever filed. Carmen Daou called for a stricter gun confiscation policy by law enforcement.

"It is time to take weapons out of abusers' hands," Daou said. "We can no longer allow them to have the tools to cause harm to innocent victims."

Deputy District Attorney Steve Dick announced a new approach Tuesday to mitigate the issue, in which local law enforcement agencies will ask individuals who are served with protective or restraining orders to voluntarily surrender their firearms and weapons immediately rather than within 24 hours, as is the policy now.

"We offer this in hopes of keeping all persons listed on the protective order safe, as well as the rest of Santa Clara County, in possible future incidents," sheriff's Sgt. Jason Brown said.

— Bay City News Service

Comments

 +   Like this comment
Posted by Otto Maddox
a resident of Monta Loma
on Feb 15, 2012 at 2:31 pm

I'm sorry but 16 deaths out of 1.7 million people is hardly an issue.

Yes, those stories were sad. But the truth is restraining orders only work on people who weren't likely to do any harm in the first place.

Crazy people will always do crazy things. We can't write "tougher" laws to combat crazy. It just doesn't work.


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Email:


Post a comment

Posting an item on Town Square is simple and requires no registration. Just complete this form and hit "submit" and your topic will appear online. Please be respectful and truthful in your postings so Town Square will continue to be a thoughtful gathering place for sharing community information and opinion. All postings are subject to our TERMS OF USE, and may be deleted if deemed inappropriate by our staff.

We prefer that you use your real name, but you may use any "member" name you wish.

Name: *

Select your neighborhood or school community: * Not sure?

Comment: *

Verification code: *
Enter the verification code exactly as shown, using capital and lowercase letters, in the multi-colored box.

*Required Fields

Grab a Bowl of Heaven soon in Mountain View
By Elena Kadvany | 0 comments | 2,596 views

Quick Check List for UC Applications
By John Raftrey and Lori McCormick | 0 comments | 1,795 views

Don't fund the rape culture at my alma mater
By Jessica T | 20 comments | 1,454 views

Palo Alto and Bay Area Election Facts and Thoughts on the Implications
By Steve Levy | 15 comments | 1,293 views

Fancy Fast and Fun!
By Laura Stec | 3 comments | 1,088 views