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Town Square

Google's new phone is a game changer

Original post made by Googlewatch on Jan 7, 2010

Google's new "Nexus One" phone, released Monday, has many advantages over the iPhone, reviewers say.

The phone has received a flurry of reviews since Monday, including a relatively critical review by [Web Link the New York Times].

Its advantages over the iPhone are clearly illustrated with pictures in [Web Link an article today] in the Huffington Post. The new phone boasts a better, replaceable battery, a better camera and a larger touch screen, to name a few of the advantages laid out in this [Web Link handy chart].

Google is going against standard industry practice in selling the phone "unlocked" so users can chose their own service provider. In another unusual move, Google is selling the phone itself at [Web Link google.com/phone].

With a two year contract, the Nexus One costs $179 while the iPhone costs $199. Without a service contract, the Nexus One costs $529 and the iPhone, $599. The cost savings is even more apparent when calculated over the two year contracts for each phone - the Nexus One will save $600 a year over the iPhone when comparing the unlimited plans available for each.

The iPhone's major advantage continues to be the fact that about 100,000 applications are available for it, compared to only about 20,000 for the Nexus One's Android operating system. But some say Google's Android/Nexus One combination may be a game changer in that regard. Unlike the iPhone's operating system, Nexus One's Android operating system is open source so anyone can create and distribute an application for it.

Comments

Posted by eric, a resident of another community
on Jan 7, 2010 at 12:46 pm

I nominate "game changer" as the most overused phrase in Silicon Valley.

Looks like the google phone has some advantages over the iphone, and likely some disadvantages. Is it better for some users? Probably. Most users? Who knows? Will Apple up the ante at some point and put out something marginally better than this unit? Of course. Then Google will bump past that, and so on.

Game Changer? How? Open source for smart phone apps is old news (and not neccessarily a good thing for end users). A better battery is good, and some other features I read about sound nice, too (the voice recognition sounds like a big improvement over the iphone)-- but they arent turning the smartphone industry on its head by any stretch.