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Los Altos restaurant and lounge closes just months after opening

Uploaded: May 22, 2023

The Flora lounge and restaurant in Los Altos has closed. Courtesy Flora via Facebook.

By Kate Bradshaw

Flora, a restaurant and lounge in downtown Los Altos, has been sold just months after it opened, according to owner and founder Ryan MacLeod Morris.

"It's with a heavy heart that I share with you some news that I want you to hear from me first, which is that I have sold Flora, effective right away, and we won't be open again," Morris said in a recent Instagram video.

"It's a good thing, even though it feels way too soon, because it gives me a chance to be home with my little twin girls more," he said.

Flora was the space's third concept in nearly as many years. Morris initially bought the Aldo Los Altos restaurant in 2020 and later converted it into BariBar Bistro, inspired by his travels in the Adriatic. By late 2022, the space had been converted into Flora, with a whole new menu.

Flora's menu was Peruvian inspired, with brunches, happy hours and indoor and outdoor seating. It was also adorned with extensive indoor plant life.

Plans for the former Flora space are not immediately known.

Flora is not the only restaurant to close suddenly in Los Altos in recent months: James Beard Award-winning Traci Des Jardin's el Alto at State Street Market shuttered suddenly in September 2022, roughly six months after opening. In January, the Los Altos food hall launched an overhaul of most of its eateries.

Morris is eager to continue to be a part of his hometown Los Altos, he said.

"Thank you so much for your years of support through this adventure and I will see you on the streets of 1st and Main," Morris added.

Democracy.
What is it worth to you?

Comments

Posted by Steve Eisner, a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown,
on May 24, 2023 at 3:29 pm

Steve Eisner is a registered user.

I ate there several months ago. I had taken someone from out of town there for brunch and it became a terrible and embarrassing experience; the service was indifferent and the portions were incredibly small (I had the Shakshouka, which was a single poached egg floating on 3mm of tomato sauce in a small skillet. I'm not surprised they weren't successful.


Posted by Steve Eisner, a resident of Menlo Park: Downtown,
on May 24, 2023 at 3:29 pm

Steve Eisner is a registered user.

I ate there several months ago. I had taken someone from out of town there for brunch and it became a terrible and embarrassing experience; the service was indifferent and the portions were incredibly small (I had the Shakshouka, which was a single poached egg floating on 3mm of tomato sauce in a small skillet. I'm not surprised they weren't successful.


Posted by Penelope Walters, a resident of another community,
on May 25, 2023 at 8:27 am

Penelope Walters is a registered user.

Shaksouka is a relatively easy dish to prepare. Some home cooks simply use a jarred spaghetti sauce, add seasonings, and plop a poached egg on top.

Curious...what did they charge for one measly poached egg stop 3mm of tomato sauce?


Posted by Bruce Haren, a resident of Duveneck/St. Francis,
on May 25, 2023 at 12:10 pm

Bruce Haren is a registered user.

I'd rather order huevos rancheros than a non-exotic Middle Eastern dish consisting of a poached egg dish with a dollop of tomato sauce and some common seasonings.


Posted by Judy Blach, a resident of Los Altos,
on May 25, 2023 at 12:25 pm

Judy Blach is a registered user.

"I'd rather order huevos rancheros than a non-exotic Middle Eastern dish consisting of a poached egg with a dollop of tomato sauce and some common seasonings."

Me too. Shaksouka is no big deal except for the cast iron skillet it is prepared in and the dish not even Peruvian.

When we visited the Middle East years ago pre 9/11, some restaurant patrons were eating it with their fingers.

Ugh. How uncivilized


Posted by Habib Aswan, a resident of another community,
on May 25, 2023 at 2:03 pm

Habib Aswan is a registered user.

Desert Arabs eat with their fingers because there are few trees from which to make dining utensils. It is also a part of our nomadic culture to eat on the run which is why we created kabobs.

In most Arab/Middle Eastern restaurants, a finger bowl is provided to rinse the fingers. If not, then the restaurant is a fake one.


Posted by stephen levy, a resident of University South,
on May 29, 2023 at 6:43 pm

stephen levy is a registered user.

Sad to hear the news Ryan


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