News

Council picks goose-inspired art for fire station

'Geese are the vigilant birds representing the spirit of public service'

Canada Geese might be a nuisance for golfers and a headache for staff at Shoreline Park, but the City Council put that aside Tuesday when it chose some goose-inspired artwork for the new Shoreline fire station.

The council selected a proposal from artist Vadim Goretsky over 20 others for art to be installed outside the soon-to-be-rebuilt Fire Station Five across the street from Shoreline Amphitheatre. Goretsky's submission is an eight-foot-tall bronze sculpture of several geese in flight, which will be commissioned at a cost of $50,000 to $60,000. Another $8,000 to $12,000 would go to a wind vane to go on top of the fire station, which features two more flying geese.

"As a golfer I have to admit a strong bias against the geese," said council member Tom Means, who eventually approved the geese sculpture. There are more than 800 geese at Shoreline Park, which has caused the city to try all sorts of measures to ward them off.

Council member Margaret Abe-Koga said the piece reminded her of another art installation of birds in flight which the council approved in 2008 for Shoreline Park.

The council nearly chose a second favorite picked by the Visual Arts Committee, a bronze statue of a kneeling firefighter and a boy wearing a firefighter hat, designed by artists Adam Reeder. But the geese sculpture is something drivers on Shoreline Boulevard would more easily notice, council members said. City staffers said Reeder's piece would more likely be noticed by pedestrians at Fire Station Three, where it could be installed during a planned renovation which is coming in under budget.

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Firefighters said they were pleased with both art proposals.

A city staff report says that as part of the flying geese sculpture, a plaque will explain the legend of how geese in Rome "saved the ancient city from the great fire started by invaders and that geese are the vigilant birds representing the spirit of public service."

The city has a policy of putting 1 percent of the cost of major projects towards art. In this case the budget is $67,000.

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Council picks goose-inspired art for fire station

'Geese are the vigilant birds representing the spirit of public service'

by / Mountain View Voice

Uploaded: Thu, Jan 21, 2010, 3:45 pm

Canada Geese might be a nuisance for golfers and a headache for staff at Shoreline Park, but the City Council put that aside Tuesday when it chose some goose-inspired artwork for the new Shoreline fire station.

The council selected a proposal from artist Vadim Goretsky over 20 others for art to be installed outside the soon-to-be-rebuilt Fire Station Five across the street from Shoreline Amphitheatre. Goretsky's submission is an eight-foot-tall bronze sculpture of several geese in flight, which will be commissioned at a cost of $50,000 to $60,000. Another $8,000 to $12,000 would go to a wind vane to go on top of the fire station, which features two more flying geese.

"As a golfer I have to admit a strong bias against the geese," said council member Tom Means, who eventually approved the geese sculpture. There are more than 800 geese at Shoreline Park, which has caused the city to try all sorts of measures to ward them off.

Council member Margaret Abe-Koga said the piece reminded her of another art installation of birds in flight which the council approved in 2008 for Shoreline Park.

The council nearly chose a second favorite picked by the Visual Arts Committee, a bronze statue of a kneeling firefighter and a boy wearing a firefighter hat, designed by artists Adam Reeder. But the geese sculpture is something drivers on Shoreline Boulevard would more easily notice, council members said. City staffers said Reeder's piece would more likely be noticed by pedestrians at Fire Station Three, where it could be installed during a planned renovation which is coming in under budget.

Firefighters said they were pleased with both art proposals.

A city staff report says that as part of the flying geese sculpture, a plaque will explain the legend of how geese in Rome "saved the ancient city from the great fire started by invaders and that geese are the vigilant birds representing the spirit of public service."

The city has a policy of putting 1 percent of the cost of major projects towards art. In this case the budget is $67,000.

Comments

Ned
Old Mountain View
on Jan 21, 2010 at 5:25 pm
Ned, Old Mountain View
on Jan 21, 2010 at 5:25 pm

Change the policy. It's not written in stone. Save the City and the taxpayers the $72,000 dollars.


Bebe
Old Mountain View
on Jan 21, 2010 at 6:02 pm
Bebe, Old Mountain View
on Jan 21, 2010 at 6:02 pm

Given the budget.

The city should only approve NEEDED items. Art at the fire station is not one of the items.

I predict a new cast of folks come election day.


LAS
Waverly Park
on Jan 22, 2010 at 2:17 pm
LAS, Waverly Park
on Jan 22, 2010 at 2:17 pm

I applaude the City for thinking long term. I know in this economy, many people are thinking more of saving. However, this will beautify the city. The other pieces of art that Mountain View has are fantastic. Art in a town makes the whole place more livable. This is what Mountain View is about - trees, art, community!
Thanks City Council!


parent
another community
on Jan 22, 2010 at 3:17 pm
parent, another community
on Jan 22, 2010 at 3:17 pm

What a beautiful fire station! Great photo!


kathy
Sylvan Park
on Jan 22, 2010 at 3:42 pm
kathy, Sylvan Park
on Jan 22, 2010 at 3:42 pm

From MV Budget update fiscal year 2010-11.....(my caps)

"For Fiscal Year 2010-11, the City is currently facing a projected structural budget DEFICIT (operating revenues not meeting operating expenditures) of $4.1 MILLION. Strategies to eliminate the projected deficit could include additional efficiencies, service reductions, and revenue increases."

So we are potentially 4M in the hole and the City Council approves 67K for public art at a fire station? Am I missing something? I am glad the firefighters are pleased. Maybe we could take the money out of their pension fund?


Web Link


Doug Pearson
Blossom Valley
on Jan 22, 2010 at 3:45 pm
Doug Pearson, Blossom Valley
on Jan 22, 2010 at 3:45 pm

I, too, like the idea of requiring 1% of major construction projects to go for art. I do not always agree that the art looks good, but I'd still rather see the owners (usually businesses, not the city) provide the artworks than not, and I'm glad the owners (when they are businesses) choose the artworks--not the city.


art lover
Blossom Valley
on Jan 22, 2010 at 5:07 pm
art lover, Blossom Valley
on Jan 22, 2010 at 5:07 pm

Public art adds value to our community by enhancing the environment. That value benefits the citizens of Mountain View by making it a more desirable place to live and attracting business to our city. I am happy to contribute a very small part of our public money to this cause.

"The city" does not select artwork. The artwork for publicly funded buildings is selected, commissioned and recommended to the city council by a committee of community members. Any citizen of Mountain View can apply to volunteer on this committee and contribute to the art selection process.


kathy
Sylvan Park
on Jan 22, 2010 at 6:46 pm
kathy, Sylvan Park
on Jan 22, 2010 at 6:46 pm

I think public art is great, and I do believe that it makes MV a more desirable place to live, with that said, I do not think it is essential to spend funds (we don't have) on public art for a fire station, especially when we are in a deficit situation. How about asking Google to write a check as part of their corporate philanthropy for the local community?


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