News

Workers dig up Native America skull

Construction workers happened on what is believed to be a 100-year-old Native American skull while working on a housing development at the corner of Calderon and Evelyn avenues a few weeks ago.

City officials say that developer Classic Communities had to halt work on the 65-home project within 50 feet of the skull, which was found under the basement of the Abate home on Calderon Avenue.

The coroner's office determined that it was at least 100 years old and Native American, so the police didn't waste much time investigating possible murder. Still, there's only suspicion as to why it was there.

Apparently, some still wonder if it was murder.

"What happened to the rest of the body is what I wondered," said Mayor Jac Siegel.

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State law requires that a member of a local Native American community be contacted when such remains are found, said Community Development Director Randy Tsuda. The person contacted was Andrew Galvin, an East Bay resident and representative of the Ohlone tribe.

Developer Scott Ward reportedly told the Old Mountain Neighborhood Association's vice chair Robert Cox that a few additional bones were found with holes drilled in them. "It was most likely a skeleton used for lessons on human anatomy. Still, we paid a fee for a proper burial of the remains, and will remain mindful of what we have found as we excavate the rest of the property."

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Workers dig up Native America skull

by / Mountain View Voice

Uploaded: Wed, Nov 9, 2011, 1:49 pm

Construction workers happened on what is believed to be a 100-year-old Native American skull while working on a housing development at the corner of Calderon and Evelyn avenues a few weeks ago.

City officials say that developer Classic Communities had to halt work on the 65-home project within 50 feet of the skull, which was found under the basement of the Abate home on Calderon Avenue.

The coroner's office determined that it was at least 100 years old and Native American, so the police didn't waste much time investigating possible murder. Still, there's only suspicion as to why it was there.

Apparently, some still wonder if it was murder.

"What happened to the rest of the body is what I wondered," said Mayor Jac Siegel.

State law requires that a member of a local Native American community be contacted when such remains are found, said Community Development Director Randy Tsuda. The person contacted was Andrew Galvin, an East Bay resident and representative of the Ohlone tribe.

Developer Scott Ward reportedly told the Old Mountain Neighborhood Association's vice chair Robert Cox that a few additional bones were found with holes drilled in them. "It was most likely a skeleton used for lessons on human anatomy. Still, we paid a fee for a proper burial of the remains, and will remain mindful of what we have found as we excavate the rest of the property."

Comments

Thom
Jackson Park
on Nov 9, 2011 at 2:54 pm
Thom, Jackson Park
on Nov 9, 2011 at 2:54 pm
3 people like this

"The coroner's office determined that it was at least 100 years old and Native American, so the police didn't waste much time investigating possible murder."

Do they plan on catching the murderer? /facepalm Talk about a waste of money. And what if there's even a remote chance this place is/was a native american burial site?


@Thom
Stierlin Estates
on Nov 9, 2011 at 3:09 pm
@Thom, Stierlin Estates
on Nov 9, 2011 at 3:09 pm
3 people like this

Reread the sentence you quoted. They didn't waste time. How is it a waste of money to not waste time?


Nikki
Old Mountain View
on Nov 9, 2011 at 3:18 pm
Nikki, Old Mountain View
on Nov 9, 2011 at 3:18 pm
3 people like this

The sentence was clumsily written, and at first read it might sound like the police quickly began investigating possible murder, when the opposite was true.


Observer
Old Mountain View
on Nov 9, 2011 at 4:03 pm
Observer, Old Mountain View
on Nov 9, 2011 at 4:03 pm
3 people like this

Indians didn't count for much back then.


Jes' Sayin'
Blossom Valley
on Nov 9, 2011 at 4:20 pm
Jes' Sayin', Blossom Valley
on Nov 9, 2011 at 4:20 pm
3 people like this

How did they determine it was Native American? Was there a toe tag on it?


Ta Tonka
Cuesta Park
on Nov 10, 2011 at 6:53 am
Ta Tonka, Cuesta Park
on Nov 10, 2011 at 6:53 am
3 people like this

Jes Sayin, modern forensics can determine race through cranial bone structures. Its quite a science but you shouldn't sound too surprised...its been going on for decades.

Here's my 1/2 baked theory: They used native american skeletons for instructional purposes, since way back then, the natives were viewed as "less than". Cut to the 1930's or 40's and the classroom instructional skeleton becomes worn out/damaged and needs replacement. They bury the old one in an effort to try and provide some remaining dignity to the remains.


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