News

Rep. Eshoo to host Social Security town hall meeting

Congresswoman teaming up with Connecticut representative for Redwood City event

Rep. Anna Eshoo, D-Palo Alto, will host a Social Security town hall meeting with Rep. John Larson, D-Hartford, of Connecticut on Tuesday, April 3, in Redwood City.

Eshoo and Larson will present their legislation, the Social Security 2100 Act, which according to the legislators increases Social Security benefits, gives senior citizens a tax cut and ensures the program is solvent for future generations. The bill was introduced last year by Larson and is co-sponsored by 171 representatives, including Eshoo.

They will discuss how participants can enhance their Social Security benefits and will take questions from the audience.

The meeting is scheduled for 1:30-3 p.m. on Tuesday at Veterans Memorial Senior Center, 1455 Madison Ave. in Redwood City. Reservations are required and can be made online or by calling Eshoo's Palo Alto office at (650) 323-2984. The meeting will also be livestreamed on Facebook.

Comments

13 people like this
Posted by Resident
a resident of Old Mountain View
on Apr 1, 2018 at 7:44 pm

I have a bone to pick with these politicians who want to increase social security benefits and give people tax cuts at the same time. Social Security is deep in debt to the US government, who has spent most of the "trust" backing the benefits. What it means is that SS is paid out of direct taxation instead of the asset portfolio which it should have. It was an easy source of money to spend without additional taxation, which is a great career move for people like Rep. Eshoo, though to be fair, I have no idea how many bills she sponsored which pilfered the SS fund, that began before her tenure.

I won't cite too many numbers here, since future projections are open to interpretation, and people all have their favorite economists to fabricate numbers, but do some internet searches for "social security unfunded liabilities". These are the projected payouts that SS must make to retirees for which it currently doesn't have anything in the "trust", meaning it must tax directly to pay these benefits, or default on them. If you listen to social security doves, who claim everything is ok, you still come up with something over $10 trillion in unfunded liabilities. If you listen to the extreme other side, it's approaching $100 trillion. The truth is somewhere in the middle, likely closer to $10T than $100T. Anyhow, in order to pay current benefits, this is the additional money we need to pay as tax payers. The earlier we are taxed and the money is deposited in a trust which has compound growth, the less the unfunded liability over time, but also, no politician wants to raise taxes right now to pay for benefits in the future, it's career suicide.

So, they promise more benefits, fewer taxes - the ostrich approach. Stick your head in the sand and pretend there is no problem. Shame on you Rep. Eshoo.


5 people like this
Posted by Questions
a resident of another community
on Apr 3, 2018 at 3:09 pm

Questions is a registered user.

So you don't believe seniors should ever get a tax break or ever get a SS increase? The article didn't say that the bill would reduce everyone's taxes; only seniors. Believe me, the seniors I know could use and increase and a tax break. Their costs go up every year, but their SS minute yearly increases don't come close to helping with the increased costs of prescriptions, medical care, food, etc. Why do you think so many of them are in such dire straights? They worked all their lives and paid into the system for many years. Don't you think they deserve a break now, in the twilight of their lives? I say make their remaining years as easy as we can. We owe it to them; they are our parents and grandparents.


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