News

Letters to the editor: Headcount tax, San Antonio school, tall projects

Change the name of our city

The City Council just greenlighted a seven-story office building on the 1-acre parcel at the corner of San Antonio Road and California Street, where the Milk Pail Market is ("Council greenlights seven-story San Antonio office project," Dec. 6). Also, a new giant office building is going in at the intersection of Rengstorff Avenue and El Camino Real, in addition to all of the other tall projects in the works along the El Camino corridor.

So I propose we change the name of our city to No View, which would be an accurate description.

Ellyn Berner

Fordham Way

Sponsored
...
Wonders of the water: Meet the tide pool whisperer of the San Mateo coastline

Dive into the aquatic oddities, coastal creatures and other rapidly-disappearing denizens of the Peninsula shores.

...
Sponsored
Wonders of the water: Meet the tide pool whisperer of the San Mateo coastline

Dive into the aquatic oddities, coastal creatures and other rapidly-disappearing denizens of the Peninsula shores.

Wish I was that clever

I'm impressed with the deal that Federal Realty has gotten from the city of Mountain View and the Los Altos School District ("LASD finalizes $155M land deal for new Mountain View school," Dec. 27). Federal Realty is getting, according to my antiquarian mathematics, a rate of return of 156% per year. I wish I could do this well on my investments that typically return 4% to 8% a year. And this is for property not bought in the depths of the Great Depression, or even property bought in the depths of the Great Recession of 2007/2008, but in the reasonably prosperous era of 2015. But I assume we have to defer to the great economists and business folks on the Mountain View City Council, who presumably know why Federal Realty was paid so handsomely, rather than having its property seized by eminent domain.

David Lewis

Oak Street

Headcount tax

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

Sign up

The city may not look much different after the $6 million large company head tax, but that revenue could be transformative for Mountain View's K-8 district ("City set to launch new headcount tax," Dec. 13). Imagine pride and property values if our K-8 district was one of the region's most well-funded?

Funding has a direct correlation with a school's success. Our high school district is already the highest-paying district in California, yet Mountain View's wealth hides that funding and achievement inequalities in the K-8 Mountain View Whisman School District. Six million dollars is about the same our K-8 school district would regularly receive if school tax funds were not redirected to the special and now outdated Shoreline business district.

The head tax was a voter measure so it is directly spoken for already, but that does not stop Mountain View from using its imagination to then give our schools their full share of the Shoreline funds. There are very few city policies that can transform students' lives overnight; this is one of those moments that could change Mountain View overnight.

Christopher Chiang, former MVWSD trustee

Space Park Way

Send letters to the editor to [email protected] Letters must be signed and no more than 300 words long.

Follow Mountain View Voice Online on Twitter @mvvoice, Facebook and on Instagram @mvvoice for breaking news, local events, photos, videos and more.

...
Sponsored
6 Steps to master the home buying process during a pandemic

Your no-stress guide to buying a home no matter what the circumstance.

Letters to the editor: Headcount tax, San Antonio school, tall projects

Uploaded: Wed, Jan 15, 2020, 9:17 am

Change the name of our city

The City Council just greenlighted a seven-story office building on the 1-acre parcel at the corner of San Antonio Road and California Street, where the Milk Pail Market is ("Council greenlights seven-story San Antonio office project," Dec. 6). Also, a new giant office building is going in at the intersection of Rengstorff Avenue and El Camino Real, in addition to all of the other tall projects in the works along the El Camino corridor.

So I propose we change the name of our city to No View, which would be an accurate description.

Ellyn Berner

Fordham Way

Wish I was that clever

I'm impressed with the deal that Federal Realty has gotten from the city of Mountain View and the Los Altos School District ("LASD finalizes $155M land deal for new Mountain View school," Dec. 27). Federal Realty is getting, according to my antiquarian mathematics, a rate of return of 156% per year. I wish I could do this well on my investments that typically return 4% to 8% a year. And this is for property not bought in the depths of the Great Depression, or even property bought in the depths of the Great Recession of 2007/2008, but in the reasonably prosperous era of 2015. But I assume we have to defer to the great economists and business folks on the Mountain View City Council, who presumably know why Federal Realty was paid so handsomely, rather than having its property seized by eminent domain.

David Lewis

Oak Street

Headcount tax

The city may not look much different after the $6 million large company head tax, but that revenue could be transformative for Mountain View's K-8 district ("City set to launch new headcount tax," Dec. 13). Imagine pride and property values if our K-8 district was one of the region's most well-funded?

Funding has a direct correlation with a school's success. Our high school district is already the highest-paying district in California, yet Mountain View's wealth hides that funding and achievement inequalities in the K-8 Mountain View Whisman School District. Six million dollars is about the same our K-8 school district would regularly receive if school tax funds were not redirected to the special and now outdated Shoreline business district.

The head tax was a voter measure so it is directly spoken for already, but that does not stop Mountain View from using its imagination to then give our schools their full share of the Shoreline funds. There are very few city policies that can transform students' lives overnight; this is one of those moments that could change Mountain View overnight.

Christopher Chiang, former MVWSD trustee

Space Park Way

Send letters to the editor to [email protected] Letters must be signed and no more than 300 words long.

Comments

Steven Nelson
Cuesta Park
on Jan 15, 2020 at 3:23 pm
Steven Nelson, Cuesta Park
on Jan 15, 2020 at 3:23 pm
5 people like this

Berkeley Unified School District, Emery SD and others use an "imaginative" local revenue source. The Los Angeles USD tried this source also - but failed 'cause they taxed TOO HIGH.

In it's absolutely best economic form; it almost becomes a Georgian Land Tax. A per square foot tax on land, using the Special Tax power of a school district. The tax rate absolutely must be applied "uniformly". (that old Barakas decision)

In it's next best form (IMO); as a parcel size (PSF) + "improvement" size (PSF) "uniform" tax rate.

In it's 'tried for years now' form; as an "improvement" Per Square Foot "uniform" tax.

Christopher -
Land (or Land and Improvements tax) based on a "uniform" rate. Berkeley has been getting this new type of tax for several years now - about 1/4 or their operational revenue. Replace the regressive all-pay-the-same parcel tax WITH 1,000,000 SqFt office pays $10,000 per year from PSF 1 CENT of tax rate. [ not 2017 Measure B fixed $127 for all Google parcels ]

My residence = about 6500 SF lot and 1700 SF improvements." At "1 cent rate" Tax of either $65, $82, $17?
Double that, to 2 CENTS per square foot "uniform". Tax of of either $130, $164, or $34.
-I've retired "my lance" on fair school special taxes Christopher. I think Greg C. has also.-


Don't miss out on the discussion!
Sign up to be notified of new comments on this topic.

Post a comment

Sorry, but further commenting on this topic has been closed.