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Town Square

The joys of home schooling

Original post made on Oct 10, 2007

On a typical weekday, Jonathan Luxton, 11, sleeps in late, eats breakfast at 11:30, plays on the computer at noon, writes legalese and enjoys reading about atomic physics.

Read the full story here Web Link posted Monday, October 8, 2007, 4:45 PM

Comments

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Posted by Jeff
a resident of another community
on Oct 10, 2007 at 10:26 am

Nice introductory story to give and reinforce ideas about the possibility or reasons for home-schooling. It helps to know so many others are doing this for their varied and respective reasons and can be successful in that path.


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Posted by chris james
a resident of The Crossings
on May 12, 2017 at 3:00 am

I really appreciate the work and ideas who wrote such informative post. All the ideas above will motivate children for doing homeschooling. Homeschooling will make kids to get quality education according to flexibility. Great post!!!


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Posted by IF YOU CAN
a resident of Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on May 12, 2017 at 9:40 am

If you can keep your child away from the troubles and risks of public schools, provide learning at home and maybe have your child interact with other children in safer settings (such as dance class), he or she will be far better off. Sure, you will still pay for public schools but so do childless adults.


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Posted by HomeSchooler
a resident of Old Mountain View
on May 12, 2017 at 9:48 am

We just started homeschooling and what a joy and difference it makes to my fifth grader who was very well-behaved and therefore ignored in the MVWSD. His reading and math skills have gone through the roof just based on the amount of time he can now devote to learning. We take long learning vacations in the off season throughout the country and are headed to Europe next year to stay with family and conduct our European homeschool adventure. I doubt he will ever go back to public schools. They are far too constrained.