News

City of Mountain View unveils Mora Park

Mora Park was unveiled to the public on June 22, 2022. Photo by Miles Breen.

On an extra warm summer day in Mountain View, elected officials, city staff members and young families gathered to celebrate the unveiling of Mora Park. The June 22 celebration was the city’s third park opening in the last year and a half, and the first in-person park reveal in more than three years.

Mora Park, located at 2290 Mora Place off Ortega Avenue, features a shiny new playground with state of the art play equipment, a grassy open space, fitness equipment, and a small seating area.

“My brother and I grew up just down the street on Gabriel Avenue, and boy how this area has transformed over the years,” said Mayor Lucas Ramirez as he addressed the crowd, full of kids buzzing with excitement to use the new playground.

Mountain View Mayor Lucas Ramirez speaks at the dedication of Mora Park on June 22, 2022. Photo by Miles Breen

Ramirez said that previously, the land was an underutilized industrial area. That area was transformed into Mora Park thanks to the city’s Parks and Open Space Plan, which requires new housing developments to either give the city land or pay a park in-lieu fee.

“In this case, we were fortunate to get 0.45 of an acre for this development to create the new park,” which came from the developer of the 2296 Mora Drive residential project, Community Services Director John Marchant told the Voice after the unveiling. “Through meetings with the architect and the public, we were able to identify what the needs and wants of the local residents were, to start identifying the elements that were of interest to them.”

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After celebrating the park’s grand opening with a ceremonial ribbon cutting, city council and visual arts committee members unveiled the city’s newest public art installation, a mosaic seating area crafted by Bay Area artist Angelina Duckett. The art piece, titled Orchards, sits adjacent to the playground, offering park-goers a place to sit and watch their children play.

Kids test out the new playground equipment at Mora Park on June 22, 2022. Photo by Malea Martin

“The call for art for this project was the theme of orchards, and Mountain View being historically an orchard town, so I wanted to kind of do an abstract version of all the types of fruits that were in orchards: plums, peaches, lemons, oranges,” Duckett told the Voice. “Bright, colorful, natural, earthy tones.”

She said it was important to her that Orchards add not only visual interest to Mora Park, but also serve as a functional sitting area.

“What’s nice about mosaics is it can go on really any concrete surface,” Duckett said. “Here I wanted to do just the vertical walls and have it kind of tucked into the bench, so that kids could climb all over the benches, (and) parents could sit and enjoy the space.”

Parents Jen Hathaway and Julie Williams attended the unveiling together with their kids.

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“I think it’s awesome,” Hathaway said. “We’ve been watching this park (get built) forever. It’s just nice to have a park close that we can walk to. We live in small spaces so it’s nice to get out and have a nice new park.”

City Services Director Marchant said Mora Park is Mountain View’s 43rd park. The city looks forward to opening its 44th one, Pyramid Park, later this year in August, which will be close to 3 acres in size.

Mountain View City Council members and visual arts committee members unveil the city’s newest public art installation, a mosaic seating area crafted by Bay Area artist Angelina Duckett, at Mora Park. Photo by Miles Breen

Malea Martin
Malea Martin covers the city hall beat in Mountain View. Before joining the Mountain View Voice in 2022, she covered local politics and education for New Times San Luis Obispo, a weekly newspaper on the Central Coast of California. Read more >>

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City of Mountain View unveils Mora Park

by / Mountain View Voice

Uploaded: Fri, Jun 24, 2022, 12:41 pm

On an extra warm summer day in Mountain View, elected officials, city staff members and young families gathered to celebrate the unveiling of Mora Park. The June 22 celebration was the city’s third park opening in the last year and a half, and the first in-person park reveal in more than three years.

Mora Park, located at 2290 Mora Place off Ortega Avenue, features a shiny new playground with state of the art play equipment, a grassy open space, fitness equipment, and a small seating area.

“My brother and I grew up just down the street on Gabriel Avenue, and boy how this area has transformed over the years,” said Mayor Lucas Ramirez as he addressed the crowd, full of kids buzzing with excitement to use the new playground.

Ramirez said that previously, the land was an underutilized industrial area. That area was transformed into Mora Park thanks to the city’s Parks and Open Space Plan, which requires new housing developments to either give the city land or pay a park in-lieu fee.

“In this case, we were fortunate to get 0.45 of an acre for this development to create the new park,” which came from the developer of the 2296 Mora Drive residential project, Community Services Director John Marchant told the Voice after the unveiling. “Through meetings with the architect and the public, we were able to identify what the needs and wants of the local residents were, to start identifying the elements that were of interest to them.”

After celebrating the park’s grand opening with a ceremonial ribbon cutting, city council and visual arts committee members unveiled the city’s newest public art installation, a mosaic seating area crafted by Bay Area artist Angelina Duckett. The art piece, titled Orchards, sits adjacent to the playground, offering park-goers a place to sit and watch their children play.

“The call for art for this project was the theme of orchards, and Mountain View being historically an orchard town, so I wanted to kind of do an abstract version of all the types of fruits that were in orchards: plums, peaches, lemons, oranges,” Duckett told the Voice. “Bright, colorful, natural, earthy tones.”

She said it was important to her that Orchards add not only visual interest to Mora Park, but also serve as a functional sitting area.

“What’s nice about mosaics is it can go on really any concrete surface,” Duckett said. “Here I wanted to do just the vertical walls and have it kind of tucked into the bench, so that kids could climb all over the benches, (and) parents could sit and enjoy the space.”

Parents Jen Hathaway and Julie Williams attended the unveiling together with their kids.

“I think it’s awesome,” Hathaway said. “We’ve been watching this park (get built) forever. It’s just nice to have a park close that we can walk to. We live in small spaces so it’s nice to get out and have a nice new park.”

City Services Director Marchant said Mora Park is Mountain View’s 43rd park. The city looks forward to opening its 44th one, Pyramid Park, later this year in August, which will be close to 3 acres in size.

Comments

ivg
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Jun 24, 2022 at 2:47 pm
ivg, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 24, 2022 at 2:47 pm

Will our water-use hawks complain about the lawn? Or is it OK since it's for "existing residents"?


Leslie Bain
Registered user
Cuesta Park
on Jun 24, 2022 at 5:41 pm
Leslie Bain, Cuesta Park
Registered user
on Jun 24, 2022 at 5:41 pm

The entire community benefits when we have sufficient greenspace for everyone to enjoy. Water remains a precious commodity, but the amount spent on this lawn is relatively trivial. And if we have drastic enough drought conditions, the water can be turned off and the lawn allowed to die. Can we do that after 30% more households have moved into MV? Turn off their water alone during times of drought? Of course we can't, that would be inhuman.

It is not evil or hypocritical for residents in a community to desire both greenspaces and an adequate water supply, one that does not force draconion cuts on households during times of drought and wildfires. I checked the article because I thought that the park must have extravagant water features or something. Nope, it does not, as far as I can see.


ivg
Registered user
Another Mountain View Neighborhood
on Jun 25, 2022 at 9:49 pm
ivg, Another Mountain View Neighborhood
Registered user
on Jun 25, 2022 at 9:49 pm

We're in a pretty drastic drought already. Maybe the lawn at Mora Park is small, but I don't understand why we still water the golf course.


Leslie Bain
Registered user
Cuesta Park
on Jun 26, 2022 at 4:27 pm
Leslie Bain, Cuesta Park
Registered user
on Jun 26, 2022 at 4:27 pm

ivg, in the past when serious droughts have been experienced residents have been forced to cut their water usage, or else pay penalties. Citizens cut their water usage, and then voila, the price of water goes up for doing the right thing because we are all using less water and of course that makes sense. Use less water -> pay the same price or more.

Up until now, MV residents are only subject to voluntary measures. However, some changes are being considered - Web Link

"The Mountain View City Council will hold a public hearing on June 28, 2022 to consider declaring a Stage 2 water shortage emergency condition. Under a Stage 2 water shortage, customers are assigned specific irrigation days based on their street address. The proposed irrigation schedule is listed below:

Even addresses – Irrigation allowed Tuesdays and Fridays.
Odd addresses – Irrigation allowed Mondays and Thursdays."

Even a Stage 2 water shortage emergency is mild in comparison to what residents have been subjected to in the past. It is not clear what the penalty will be for those who violate the proposed schedule. If there are no penalties, the program is still de facto voluntary.

However, some of us have let our yards die and we don't flush our toilets every time because that is what we have been trained to do based on past droughts. Is this disgusting? Yes it is. Is this "the right thing" to do? We have been trained to think that it is.

The best part is that when more severe emergency measures are enacted, and everyone is forced to cut their usage by x% or else pay penalties, those of us who are already doing our best to cut back on water usage to the bare bones will be penalized. When you have already killed your lawn and you aren't flushing your toilets, it's very difficult to cut back an additional amount on top of it.


Old Steve
Registered user
Rex Manor
on Jun 26, 2022 at 10:57 pm
Old Steve, Rex Manor
Registered user
on Jun 26, 2022 at 10:57 pm

If you have ever visited our Shoreline Golf Course, you would know it is irrigated with reclaimed water from the Palo Alto treatment plant. This water is not suitable for drinking, or many other domestic uses. Our local golf courses don't have any impact on our drought responses.


Steven Nelson
Registered user
Cuesta Park
on Jun 28, 2022 at 4:34 pm
Steven Nelson, Cuesta Park
Registered user
on Jun 28, 2022 at 4:34 pm

just as Old Steven / The irrigation water from 'tertiary treatment' (waste water) is a resource that MV City has tried to use for decades. It usually works! In the North Bayshore area it has also been used extensively for street median plantings. Unfortunately, redwood trees need a diluted version, because they can't stand the high salinity over decades.
- If North Bayshore development Is Required to use ("purple pipe"?) recycled water for toilets and general landscaping .... (saves ?M gallons of drinkable water per year?)


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