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Navy renews vow to de-skin Hangar One

To save landmark structure, 'There needs to be a plan' for reuse, Eshoo says

Congresswoman Anna Eshoo said Tuesday that a serious plan for reusing Hangar One must be in place if Congress is likely to fund restoration of the historic landmark at Moffett Field.

"If part of the partnership is the Congress of the United States, they are going to want to know what we want to do with the money," Eshoo told the Voice. "They are going to want to know if it makes sense. Is it going to be used for a museum or used by others in the community? There needs to be a plan."

Concern over Hangar One has reached new heights since Jan. 14, when Navy spokesperson Kathryn Stewart told the Moffett Restoration Advisory Board that the Navy plans to tear off Hangar One's siding in November of this year. With no plan or funding in place to re-skin it, local elected officials have unanimously opposed the idea of leaving the historic structure as a steel skeleton.

To address the problem, Eshoo said she would be meeting "as soon as possible" with NASA, which owns Hangar One, and the Navy, which is responsible for cleaning up the toxic asbestos and PCBs embedded in Hangar One's siding. The White House Office of Management and Budget, which has been arbitrating an agreement between the Navy and NASA on Hangar One's restoration, has also requested to be a part of the meeting, she said.

The comments from Stewart on Jan. 14 appear to contradict previous comments from Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, who had said in a letter to Eshoo that it was his "intention" to wait for a decision from the OMB before removing Hangar One's siding.

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When asked if she was surprised about Stewart's comments to the contrary, Eshoo said, "The person that speaks for the Navy is the secretary of the Navy. I did receive a letter from Secretary Mabus a while back assuring me the Navy would not take down the siding before the OMB renders its decision. My understanding is that his position hasn't changed."

Eshoo was also pressed about what she would do to "prepare for the worst" if there was not a good plan for reusing Hangar One.

"I am not thinking that way," she said. "I don't build on the negative. I work on a positive viewpoint. This by no means is over."

Meeting site to be scrapped

Building 943, located just outside the main gate at Moffett Field, has been the ideal meeting location for the Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board, or RAB, for years. But it is now set to be demolished in March.

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Kathryn Stewart, Navy co-chair for the RAB, said she would be looking for another location for the group's next meeting, possibly within Moffett's main security gate.

As the battle to save historic Hangar One heats up, preservationists are concerned about how any location change could affect turnout for future RAB meetings. RAB member Steve Williams said that forcing people to come through the Moffett main gate, where a security guard requires valid government identification, would have a "chilling effect" on future meetings. He said it was appropriate to have the meeting at Moffett, and called for the Navy to demand that NASA allow people to pass through the gate for the meeting without being checked. That spurred a discussion in which most said the gate was an unnecessary security measure.

Recent discussions by the RAB about Hangar One have included concerns about what will happen to the windows, which are an important part of the hangar's character, members say. The hangar's interior structures, scheduled to be demolished in late March, are also a concern.

NASA spokesperson Rachel Prucey said Building 943 was being torn down so the money saved on ongoing maintenance could offset the cost of the new "Sustainability Base" a two story NASA office building inside the Moffett main gate. The gift shop inside building 943 will be moved to the tent next door.

The location and time of the next Moffett RAB meeting will be announced on the Navy's Base Realignment and Closure Web site at www.bracpmo.navy.mil.

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Navy renews vow to de-skin Hangar One

To save landmark structure, 'There needs to be a plan' for reuse, Eshoo says

by Daniel DeBolt / Mountain View Voice

Uploaded: Tue, Jan 26, 2010, 7:49 pm

Congresswoman Anna Eshoo said Tuesday that a serious plan for reusing Hangar One must be in place if Congress is likely to fund restoration of the historic landmark at Moffett Field.

"If part of the partnership is the Congress of the United States, they are going to want to know what we want to do with the money," Eshoo told the Voice. "They are going to want to know if it makes sense. Is it going to be used for a museum or used by others in the community? There needs to be a plan."

Concern over Hangar One has reached new heights since Jan. 14, when Navy spokesperson Kathryn Stewart told the Moffett Restoration Advisory Board that the Navy plans to tear off Hangar One's siding in November of this year. With no plan or funding in place to re-skin it, local elected officials have unanimously opposed the idea of leaving the historic structure as a steel skeleton.

To address the problem, Eshoo said she would be meeting "as soon as possible" with NASA, which owns Hangar One, and the Navy, which is responsible for cleaning up the toxic asbestos and PCBs embedded in Hangar One's siding. The White House Office of Management and Budget, which has been arbitrating an agreement between the Navy and NASA on Hangar One's restoration, has also requested to be a part of the meeting, she said.

The comments from Stewart on Jan. 14 appear to contradict previous comments from Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, who had said in a letter to Eshoo that it was his "intention" to wait for a decision from the OMB before removing Hangar One's siding.

When asked if she was surprised about Stewart's comments to the contrary, Eshoo said, "The person that speaks for the Navy is the secretary of the Navy. I did receive a letter from Secretary Mabus a while back assuring me the Navy would not take down the siding before the OMB renders its decision. My understanding is that his position hasn't changed."

Eshoo was also pressed about what she would do to "prepare for the worst" if there was not a good plan for reusing Hangar One.

"I am not thinking that way," she said. "I don't build on the negative. I work on a positive viewpoint. This by no means is over."

Meeting site to be scrapped

Building 943, located just outside the main gate at Moffett Field, has been the ideal meeting location for the Moffett Field Restoration Advisory Board, or RAB, for years. But it is now set to be demolished in March.

Kathryn Stewart, Navy co-chair for the RAB, said she would be looking for another location for the group's next meeting, possibly within Moffett's main security gate.

As the battle to save historic Hangar One heats up, preservationists are concerned about how any location change could affect turnout for future RAB meetings. RAB member Steve Williams said that forcing people to come through the Moffett main gate, where a security guard requires valid government identification, would have a "chilling effect" on future meetings. He said it was appropriate to have the meeting at Moffett, and called for the Navy to demand that NASA allow people to pass through the gate for the meeting without being checked. That spurred a discussion in which most said the gate was an unnecessary security measure.

Recent discussions by the RAB about Hangar One have included concerns about what will happen to the windows, which are an important part of the hangar's character, members say. The hangar's interior structures, scheduled to be demolished in late March, are also a concern.

NASA spokesperson Rachel Prucey said Building 943 was being torn down so the money saved on ongoing maintenance could offset the cost of the new "Sustainability Base" a two story NASA office building inside the Moffett main gate. The gift shop inside building 943 will be moved to the tent next door.

The location and time of the next Moffett RAB meeting will be announced on the Navy's Base Realignment and Closure Web site at www.bracpmo.navy.mil.

Comments

J. Ravanelli
Whisman Station
on Jan 26, 2010 at 8:34 pm
J. Ravanelli, Whisman Station
on Jan 26, 2010 at 8:34 pm

"If part of the partnership is the Congress of the United States, they are going to want to know what we want to do with the money,"

since when does the government care where the money goes? or what they do with it?

"They are going to want to know if it makes sense. Is it going to be used for a museum or used by others in the community? There needs to be a plan."

really? the government is concerned as to wether or not something makes sense?

To address the problem, Eshoo said she would be meeting "as soon as possible"

RIGHT!!!!

the navy used the moffett field as thier own toxic waste dump FOR YEARS!!just as the air force destroyed the majestic peak of mt. umunhum for so many years, and now they are worried about some lead paint and asbestos?
the fact is , hanger one IS history. reflecting a time when this great country was great. as it sits now, it is truly a reflection of what our great land, and its government has become, a toxic chunk of nothing, an eyesore to some a flat out head ache to others. heres an idea! repaint hanger one. just paint right over the " deadly" lead paint and asbestos, and turn it in to one helluva aviation history meuseum.it sickens me to see what a scared pussy foot society we have become. california is probably the worst offender in this area.
so anna eshoo, instead of trying to bs us in your remarks of congress' "concern" of where OUR (the taxpayers) money goes, why don't you put it to the local community. those of us that get to leave our homes every morning and see the historic, if not majestic, artificial mountain that man created ? as a child seeing it for the first time, i was in awe and vowed that i would climb atop the mammoth structure. during an one of the many air shows of the past, i did just that! i will never forget being escorted off base by some very pissed navy security officers, being told" not to ever show up on this property again!" laughing hysterically the following summer as i went up again and carved my initials into the trap door at the top next to so many others.(you should see the view up there!) so come on anna! let those of us that live here in sight of the hanger decide what to do with the money to hopefully restore, and reshape the future of this cities past.



Local Yocal
another community
on Jan 27, 2010 at 9:25 am
Local Yocal, another community
on Jan 27, 2010 at 9:25 am

Hangar One is not just local history, it's national history and deserves respect as a historical structure. I think this effort to save it needs a better PR campaign too. Instead of saying "skin" the hangar, can we say "restore" or "renovate". Semantics? Yes, but it can help to remind that this structure is unique and means a great deal to many Americans who appreciate its history.


Bruno
Old Mountain View
on Jan 27, 2010 at 10:15 am
Bruno, Old Mountain View
on Jan 27, 2010 at 10:15 am

Now I really want some more air shows so I can climb up top like Mr. Ravanelli. That must have been so cool!


Don Frances
Registered user
Mountain View Voice Editor
on Jan 27, 2010 at 10:27 am
Don Frances, Mountain View Voice Editor
Registered user
on Jan 27, 2010 at 10:27 am

Just to be clear, we meant "skin" as in take the skin off, not as in re-skin. The Navy has made no indication that it will help restore or renovate the hangar in any way.


carl crebar
Shoreline West
on Jan 27, 2010 at 3:01 pm
carl crebar, Shoreline West
on Jan 27, 2010 at 3:01 pm

What is it worth to keep it??? How do you measure value attempting to
compare real costs to a historic presence.......I suppose it depends on your own personal value system......Well for me it's easy....restore and retain this hallmark of history......


Bobby
another community
on Jan 28, 2010 at 1:16 am
Bobby, another community
on Jan 28, 2010 at 1:16 am

There should be a revenue generating use for the hangar. Since Maple Pavilion at Stanford is a small crammed gym, perhaps Stanford could have basketball games inside. Maybe, even a football game or two. The hangar is HUGE and near a light rail station.

Another possibility is Shoreline Ampitheatre could use it for indoor concerts, especially during the winter season.

Just do not be like those douchebags in Tustin who decided to tear down one of their historical hangars and transform the other one into an unrecognizable commercial abomination.


Jane B
Cuernavaca
on Feb 3, 2010 at 1:19 am
Jane B, Cuernavaca
on Feb 3, 2010 at 1:19 am

Just get it over with and tear it down. Build tiny little houses for Googlers in its place.


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